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The Commodore
15-12-2008, 04:01 AM
Ok..., after nearly sixteen years of ritual avoidance, I am going to start using Greenstuff. The work you guys have put together have both amazed and astounded me over the last year.

So here I am hat in hand, asking politely for any tips, advice or just general knowhow, on how to use the stuff.

It's time to change with the times methinks....:D

Tallarn
15-12-2008, 04:05 AM
get yourself a small sculpting kit, go to local hobby store and in the clay section - it will be there. You want various sculpting blades and widgets, just pretend you are daft and they will help you.

Decide what you are going to use for lubrication, I use water - others use vasoline and other stuff. Either way you need something to keep the green stuff from attacking your tools...

The Commodore
15-12-2008, 04:25 AM
get yourself a small sculpting kit, go to local hobby store and in the clay section - it will be there. You want various sculpting blades and widgets, just pretend you are daft and they will help you.

Decide what you are going to use for lubrication, I use water - others use vasoline and other stuff. Either way you need something to keep the green stuff from attacking your tools...

The first bit shouldn't be difficult for me. :D

On the second what would you specifically advise??

Tallarn
16-12-2008, 02:04 AM
I would suggest using what Logan uses, he is ninja.

The Commodore
16-12-2008, 04:23 AM
I would suggest using what Logan uses, he is ninja.

That is not very helpful you know?? :o

Deathboon
16-12-2008, 11:50 AM
I use water personally, just keep a small cup of it near by like you would if you were painting, and keep your tools (fingers included) moistened.

The Commodore
16-12-2008, 02:07 PM
Thanks mate i'll give that a try.

Eodred
16-12-2008, 05:13 PM
You've got to keep your tools and fingers wet at all times otherwise the GS can stick to you and pull itself off of whatever it is you're working on, trust me that sucks.
Apart from that, try things before you do it on a finshed mini if you're not sure of how to do it and if you don't like the end result don't be afraid to tear it off and start again.

Let us know how you get on.
Cheers
E

LAZtheinfamous
17-12-2008, 01:35 AM
While the water/lube tip is of utmost importance. I can understand what you are going through, I just started using the GS a little while ago. My favorite tips;

1. Work on basic shapes first. There's a couple of reasons for this. One is to get the 'feel' of GS. GS does not model like anything else in the universe. To me its like coming home, just enough resistance, yet the right amount of it does what it says on the tin.
2. EVERYTHING is made of basic shapes. If you can do a cone- you can do horns, spikes, etc. If you can do a cube/box- you can do weapons. If you can do a tube- you can do those big wire tubes on everything in 40K. Etc.
3. The two most importance skills I can think of though are the 'snake' and the 'sheet'. These are skills that most of us master with Play-Doh in pre-school, but don't underestimate thier importance. The snake is rolling out green stuff in a long tube (It's a snake Daddy!). The sheet is where you flatten out a piece into a sheet. Either of these is ok by itself, but when you cut them down, you can use them for alot of different things (Great Coats anyone?).
4. Tools are over-rated. I use the GW tool, a box cutter, a pin, and my fingers. Anything will do! Necessity is the mother of invention.
5. Keep a spare model or armiture around for your left overs. A little bit of GS goes along way. Actually most of the time when you think that you didn't mix enough, you have too much. Especially at first. So having something sitting around that you can just throw it on and experiment with it. (Dark Eldar are perfect for this. Thier thin enough that adding more to them bulks them to human standard nicely).
6. Don't try for everything all at once. Don't try to make the thing everything at once. Make the basic form, then add a little at a time. For instance, with a great coat, make the coat, then let it set. Then go back and add the details like the lining, pockets, etc.
7. GS does set after 45 minutes or so, but I suggest letting it go overnight. It helps strengthen it.

The Commodore
17-12-2008, 09:01 AM
Thanks mate,that's some Great Stuff to go on with.

Have a rep cookie.

Bytemeh2
17-12-2008, 07:33 PM
As everyone else has said, keep a bit of water near your work area. I also like to have a small sponge and/or cloth near by for spills. I also just use some dentist tools I bought from a college book store here, lots of neat stuff to work with, but the sculpting kits at any hobby shop will do, or if you are just trying it out a hobby knife works just as well; though I recommend using an older one that you might not use anymore.

I would suggest trying your hand at sculpting fur, feathers, or fire first. They are relatively easy to master with a bit of practice and helps familiarize yourself with how GS works, dries, and all that good stuff. I started with adding some flames to torches, banners and weapons and fur collars on my chaos warband. Spikes and armor plates are also good ways to practice. The GW site has a decent article or two about using GS in this manner that really helped me get started.

If you are building up on something and then adding detail, I prefer to use plumber's putty to build up the bulk and then us GS for the details. Plumber's putty is also a cheaper alternative for just filling in gaps, then adding extra furs, armor plates, rivets, etc with the green stuff; but beware, the plumber's putty smells aweful until it drys. :)

The Commodore
17-12-2008, 11:42 PM
MMMMmmmm, that's a pretty good idea actually. I'll look into that.

Thanks.

Kishvier
18-12-2008, 07:51 PM
Toothpicks. Great cheap little things, especially when you can't afford any sculpting tools.

Eodred
18-12-2008, 10:17 PM
And needles, especially if you get a mix of thick and thin ones.

E