PDA

View Full Version : Types of Shading



Pherion
17-11-2009, 04:45 PM
Ok, so I hear a lot of different terms for shading: Feathering, Layering, and Wet Layering (Shading) particularly. I'd like to open up a discussion of how each one of these techniques is accomplished, and what its advantages/drawbacks are.

I personally, am not even certain how each of these is done (I know how I do shading, but I'm not certain which category it fits into), so speak up and let us know how you shade, and what you think of these techniques!

Consadine
17-11-2009, 05:10 PM
I thought you were talking about shading like "apply a wash and be done with it". Shading involves depth and darker colors; highlighting is really what you're after.

Feathering is where you apply a line of paint, then use another brush with clean, damp bristles and pull the line out in the direction you want the gradient. Example here (http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn12/zilities/IMG_0003-82.jpg).

Layering is exactly what it sounds like: layer paint from dark to light in order to make the gradient. If you water your paint down so it's dirty water and no longer thin paint, you have a glaze. Many layers of a glaze will deposit color and is a great way to do layering that yields smooth gradients. Examples of layering and layering with a glaze can be found on Stern here (http://www.astronomican.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13849).

Wet-blending is the 3rd method you mentioned and involves putting two colors of paint on the surface and blending them together with a brush with clean, damp bristles. A drying retardant mixed with your paint will aid in this immensely, but in a pinch you can use water; the downside to using water is that the surface tension makes small-scale blending hard to do, but it will work on large surfaces. Examples here (http://www.coolminiornot.com/article/aid/58).

Pherion
17-11-2009, 06:24 PM
Yes! You're right, it is highlighting. My fault :-P

So the only thing I've tried up to this point is layering. I guess my question then is, what are the advantages of wet-blending and feathering. It seems that wet-blending is just a more advanced version of layering (I cant pull up the image here at work, so forgive me if its completly differnt), and feathering is perhaps for areas where there would be creases that would stretch out in the direction you pull the paint?

Arkaedin
17-11-2009, 07:13 PM
Err.. no, it's not highlighting. It's exactly what you called it: shading. You can use those techniques for highlighting, but they're meant to be used for shading. For feathering (as an example) you would paint your model the base color, then feather your shadow color into the recesses and then your highlight colors on the edges. That is shading, the process of creating layers of depth (from dark to bright).

The advantage of wet blending is that it is a fast process, but if you screw up, it's hard to correct. With feathering, it takes more effort but you have far more control over color placement.

redbeardthefarmer
17-11-2009, 07:36 PM
Thank you Ark! I am realizing what I did wrong in my attempt to highlight and shade on my Night Goblins. I was totally reading my "How to paint citadel miniatures" book wrong. Awesome. I am not going back and redoing them now, but I know what to do now for my future gobbos. This makes me happy. Almost as happy as when my experiment on my gobbos shields turned out as awesome as I hoped for.

Redbeard

Inquisitor Alex
17-11-2009, 07:46 PM
"Feathering" is also a term used by housepainters\decorators for a multi-directional drybrushing technique to get rid of brush streaks. I use this technique for weathering tanks, buildings, etc. You kinda want a big messed-up brush for this technique. Feathering as Ark has described it is technically "spot feathering", and can be used to add shadows as well as hilights.

Pherion
17-11-2009, 07:51 PM
Do you have any suggestions as to products to use for thinner (or to keep the paint from drying quickly), specifically for wet-blending and feathering? I don't think my water would keep the paint wet long enough, or as Cos mentioned, break the surface tension.

Also, are there any specifics on how you mix the paint when wet-blending? Seems pretty hodgepodge from the descriptions given. I mean is it really that easy? Just plop on the two colors and mix?

Arkaedin
17-11-2009, 08:20 PM
The paint should be about the consistency of skim milk. It will take you awhile to get it right, but once you get it it'll be like second nature. I used to use just water to thin my paints and it works wonderfully, but lately I've been using about a 20:1 mix of water and liquitex flow-aid. It just seems to last a bit longer on my palette and I feel like I have more control during application.

Inquisitor Alex
17-11-2009, 08:37 PM
I've never tried an acrylic thinner. Might give it a shot though. I like liquiitex paints when I'm working 2d on canvas or wood, so maybe I'll check theirs out. Flow-aid eh ? Thanks, Arkaedin :)

Pherion
17-11-2009, 08:54 PM
Think I'll pick up some of that stuff. I have noticed surface tension problems with my paints at times.

Back to Feathering. Can you do multiple layers of feathering? If so, should you be pulling the paint out at the same point along the highlight for each layer, or can you pull them out at differnt points? Cos, your pic looks like its maybe one or two layers of layering, then a single feathering layer. Is that correct?

Consadine
17-11-2009, 09:01 PM
You can do multiple layers if you want a stronger color; let the first go dry then go at it again. Some of the one on the Phoenix Guard's cloak were single and some were two layers.

Inquisitor Alex
18-11-2009, 01:09 AM
Think I'll pick up some of that stuff. I have noticed surface tension problems with my paints at times.

Back to Feathering. Can you do multiple layers of feathering? If so, should you be pulling the paint out at the same point along the highlight for each layer, or can you pull them out at differnt points? Cos, your pic looks like its maybe one or two layers of layering, then a single feathering layer. Is that correct?

Whose pic ?

Pherion
18-11-2009, 01:17 AM
Consadine's pic :-P

Consadine
18-11-2009, 01:52 AM
This guy:

http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn12/zilities/IMG_0003-82.jpg