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Captain Castus
21-09-2009, 01:05 PM
Just found this tutorial online...

It's written by a Swede... And the English is a bit... Hrem...

But it sounds like a really interesting technique!!

Rusty Armour Plating (http://hem.passagen.se/tiking/PDF/howtomakemodernarmorplates.pdf)

Would look good on Ork trukks n the like I reckon...

CC

Hephesto
21-09-2009, 01:33 PM
Looks great indeed. Minor issue though, wouldn't using actual rust make your vehicles rather hazardous to use (i.e. poisonous) :D

Captain Kellen
21-09-2009, 01:36 PM
Looks great indeed. Minor issue though, wouldn't using actual rust make your vehicles rather hazardous to use (i.e. poisonous) :D

I suppose if you were eating them it would be a problem. Do you have an iron/plastic deficiency we need to know about Heph? :p

Nice idea!

I hate the idea they put it on the HMMT, but that's just me.

CK

Captain Castus
21-09-2009, 02:36 PM
Heph licks all his models... It's just a little 'fascination' he has... ;)

Are metal oxides really that toxic?! (asks the doctor...)

CC

Hephesto
21-09-2009, 02:59 PM
You'd be suprized about the things that end up in my mouth during converting :p

I was more worried about getting actual rust into a wound or something.

Consadine
21-09-2009, 03:04 PM
Heph licks all his models...

You don't?! :eek:

I jest. Or do I...

I don't think rust at that scale is toxic. Now when you start having a few spoons worth of rust powder, then you might not feel well. Disclaimer: I am most definitely not a doctor :p

Scoppio
21-09-2009, 03:30 PM
when I was a kid I usued to EAT rust (thats true), never had a problem.

To be honest with you guys, the effect is just lame, and up with an atificial look if you "put that anywhere".

Honsou
21-09-2009, 07:37 PM
Looks great indeed. Minor issue though, wouldn't using actual rust make your vehicles rather hazardous to use (i.e. poisonous) :D

There are a few, extremely rare, medical conditions that would make that dangerous- but unless you suffer from those, and aren't eating it for dinner every night, it shouldn't be a problem.

Interesting method though, good find CC!

Dante
22-09-2009, 02:49 AM
pretty sure you would have to eat alot of it before it became a problem...

Honsou
22-09-2009, 03:08 AM
pretty sure you would have to eat alot of it before it became a problem...

Well, in the absence of a medical condition it wouldn't matter, your body can deal with it. It's only if you overload it (and we're talking insane amounts in an extremely short period of time) or if you're body isn't capable of dealing with it. That said, if anyone worries about it- that's what all those nice other articles about how to create rust effects are for.

Captain Castus
22-09-2009, 10:03 AM
Depends on the metal... Tin oxide (for example, which is what I expect this is) is non-toxic...

Some others, particularly some heavy metals (e.g. lead!) wouldn't be so good to eat too much of... ;)

CC

Captain Kellen
22-09-2009, 12:05 PM
Lead... so that's my problem... all those lead figures when I was younger. No wonder people went to plastic.

CK

Honsou
22-09-2009, 04:39 PM
Lead... so that's my problem... all those lead figures when I was younger. No wonder people went to plastic.

CK

I've got some uranium you can play with, if you want... >> xD

Ossai
22-09-2009, 04:47 PM
Plutonium is more fun. Tastes pretty good as well.

Shenanegins aside this looks like an interesting technique, though I think I will be sticking to rust effect (when I get some :D) not as much hassle.

grinkohof
24-09-2009, 12:01 AM
There are a few, extremely rare, medical conditions that would make that dangerous- but unless you suffer from those, and aren't eating it for dinner every night, it shouldn't be a problem.



make no mistake about it guys, if you ingest any rust, get it in an open wound or cut yourself with something rusty you WILL need a tetanus injection.


either way the link appears to be broken so i can't even see what rust we are dealing with here!

Captain Castus
30-09-2009, 09:57 AM
make no mistake about it guys, if you ingest any rust, get it in an open wound or cut yourself with something rusty you WILL need a tetanus injection.


either way the link appears to be broken so i can't even see what rust we are dealing with here!

It's still working for me!

BTW... Just because something's rusty it doesn't mean it's automatically colonised with clostridium tetani! The main source of spores is actually soil... So any dirty wound (especially if deep) is a tetanus risk... 'Clean' rust shouldn't be a problem... Trust me! ;)

CC

aardvark
11-10-2009, 08:32 PM
Leaving health hazards aside (but hold that thought), this is a bloody brilliant idea! I've often thought of using metal sheet for Ork conversions.

Of course you need steel sheet, which the article doesn't make clear. Not the easiet thing to come by, but I'm sure it's out there.

The problem is, how do you replicate this effect on plastic parts, as you will surely need to do? This is where the though-holding comes in .....

There is a US craft product that actually has iron paint. It's OK on plastic if you use the primer. It comes with a bottle of rusting solution, which I guess works in the same way as the vinegar in the Swedish article. I've seen some very good rusty tank models using it.

Problem is, it's banned in the UK and no-one in the US will ship it over in case they get done by Customs. Shipping charges are horrendous because of the weight anyway.

There is a product often seen on eBay called Scenic Rust. Not sure what this is or how it works - never used it. Presumably it doesn't contain any banned substance as it's openly on sale. I do know it has at least 2 parts to it, and possibly involves powder too. Cost seems to be at ;east 12 a pack.