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gcsmith
16-09-2009, 03:35 PM
Hey guys, i dnt no where to put this but its kinda WIP so... anyone one know how to get known to get asked to do commision, just im improving my painting skills and hoping to do some commision in future :p i just wanna get into painting nice.
Soz again if this is the wrong place.

Consadine
16-09-2009, 03:42 PM
You're wanting to know how to get into commission painting?

Well, paint well. Really well. Even that isn't enough, so it helps to win painting contests at your local store to give you some credibility. Then work on some social engineering to let people in your area know that you'll paint their miniatures.

Something like that. As a note, I haven't done commission painting so my advice is just how I would go about it.

Oh, and I've moved this thread to Modeling/Painting. The WIP area is for projects in progress!

gcsmith
16-09-2009, 04:02 PM
k ty, any more advice would be good :p

Arctophylax Faren
16-09-2009, 04:04 PM
Just post pictures of your work on every model board in existence. If it's good, it'll get you noticed. But don't expect people to pay you to paint their models so your skill improves - people only want the best.

Consadine
16-09-2009, 04:05 PM
Some other things that come to mind.

A set chart/rubric/guide for prices is essential, I would think. That way people can see how much they expect to pay upfront. Have set levels of detail (table-top, character and showcase - examples) with their price for single, unit (2-10), unit (11+) and vehicle.

If you're up to it, offer the option to include the price of the box in the total cost so you'll build the minis and then paint them. For example, $35 for a Tactical Marine box, plus $X amount for each mini.

Captain Castus
16-09-2009, 05:31 PM
Also... Simple things like spelling commission properly will increase your credibility... :D

Sorry... Couldn't resist!!

Seriously... A way to get started is just to paint and Ebay some models on a non-commission basis... Then you can give 'examples' of work you have already sold... ;)

CC

Honsou
16-09-2009, 05:53 PM
Simply put: be the best. There are a few things you can do to help you gain a foothold as a commission painter:

1. Be the best. I do not mean go and join the army, but always practice, practice, practice! If you have the necessary skills to paint, then practice will hone them. You need to be very good, and you'll want to be at a level where you can produce extremely high quality both consistently and in a short period of time.

2. Learn. Even if you've achieved number 1, there's alway more practice, and learning to do. Read WDs painting articles (sadly, these days, good material in WD is a rare thing, but they do come on occasion- I recommend just buying in store, you can leaf through them there to check whether it's worth buying), as well as the GW website, other painter's blogs/WIPS (Heph, Luther are two of our own that spring to mind- there are plenty out there), the specialist books and so on. On top of this, do one on one sessions with GW staff or other painters (particularly if there are GD winners, etc among them).

3. Advertise. What you're looking for is growth advertising, you want it to spread around that you're someone worth going to. This means that you need to show off your work- talk to your local GW store, they may well allow you to post a sign and even put up your own models for display. Run your own blog- that may sound like alot of work, but if you have a regularly undated blog and you show of your work, and make sure it's clear that you do commissions, then that'll generate business (again, growth- it'll talk itself around, and you can also post a link in a WIP here for example, and other sites, etc). That leads to my next point: WIPS. Do them. It's worth it.

4. Enter competitions. Everything from a painting commission on astro to the Golden Demon. If you see a competition, then enter it- keep your eyes open and always be searching. The more you place near the top, the more known you'll become- and you can even consider selling the models to gain a little cash on the side.

5. Teach. Yes, that's right. True, not everyone has it in them to teach, but if you're prepared to do that, then you can perhaps set up a few sessions in your local GW store (they are often more than happy to have people help with this sort of thing) or game club- show people a few tricks, show them your models, etc. What you're looking to do is establish it in your area that you are someone worth approaching on the subject of painting- if you also make it clear that you do commission, well that's going to improve your chances.

6. The internet is your friend. Alongside your blog, set up a website- they aren't hard to do, particularly if you use one of the 'premade' set ups from freewebz, or whatnot (take a look around, there are many possibilities for free and easy sites- if you really jump off as a commission painter you could even go real professional with it). Make sure that it looks professional, that it comes up near the top of a google search, that it has lots of in links (establish connections with other sites, other commission painters, hobby groups and so on- approach them and get them to post a link to your site/blog). The aim is to generate as many hits as possible, as a certain percentage will be interested in getting a commission done by you- meaning that the more interest you generate, the more you'll get out of it.

7. Think out your business strategy. Have price guides, have time frames, postage values, costs, etc all worked out before you try going off half-cocked. Make sure the information is easily accessible on your website, and make sure it's both up-to-date and covers the world. If everything is professional, then you'll improve your situation.

8. Don't be a fool. Avoid becoming or appearing elitist- you might get commissions from anything from speed painting a few hundred figures, to doing one of display cases- don't turn down any that you think you can humanly pull off, but if you DO accept them- do it right and inside the time frame. Treat everyone appropriately, never look down on them, and so on- in short: BE PROFESSIONAL. If people see you as a professional commission painter then they'll bring their business to you, they'll tell others, etc (again, growth business- if you do good, you get good coming back at you).

Running out of ideas, so I'll leave you with that shall I.

gcsmith
16-09-2009, 08:23 PM
lol ty for the advice, seems a lot of work, Tbh i was just looking into it as a friend of mine has got local commissions and i wanted to do something like that in future, Not yet as im still improving, ill post something in my HE bit soon. anyway i might never do it as i wouldnt do it as a business but as a side of my hobby when theres nothing else for me to paint. Need to finish A levels 1st tho :p.

But thank you all for your welcome advice.

Honsou
16-09-2009, 09:22 PM
Well that is of course a very different approach- in that case there's not much else to it than saying 'yes' if anyone ever asks :P But if you want to do it as a more directed thing, as a business side to the hobby, then you need to put the effort in.

grimdisco
16-09-2009, 11:42 PM
Doing commission painting is not to hard to get into.
First Get on any local message boards for gaming.
Second Paint an army (themed works the best.)
Third when people comment on how good your army looks. Let them know you also paint for commission.

It worked for me.
I now do commission work for people all over the US and England.

Eodred
17-09-2009, 10:32 AM
I was wondering about this myself.

Excellent responses,thanks.

Thread is now bookmarked.


Cheers
E

gcsmith
17-09-2009, 03:45 PM
Wow! a thread of mine bookmarked :p anyway im doing a themed HE army soon, after i buy some guard stuff, and since they can take DoW im gonna do i think a giant flame elemental for them, Might look good. It will count as a giant btw